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Amazon Fire TV Cube now supports audio streaming for hearing aids

Tech giant Amazon has announced that its Fire TV Cube (2nd gen) now supports Audio Streaming for Hearing Aids (ASHA) to directly connect compatible Bluetooth hearing aids.

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San Francisco, April 29 Tech giant Amazon has announced that its Fire TV Cube (2nd gen) now supports Audio Streaming for Hearing Aids (ASHA) to directly connect compatible Bluetooth hearing aids.

The company said that this makes Fire TV the first-ever streaming media player to support ASHA.

"With this feature, your hearing aids connect with Fire TV at the system level, so you can not only enjoy audio from your favourite apps but also Alexa, music, navigational sounds, and more," the company said in a blogpost.

"Customers with compatible Starkey Bluetooth hearing aids can connect directly to Fire TV Cube for private listening, use your remote's volume buttons to control the streaming audio level," it added.

Bluetooth hearing aids connect with Fire TV on a system level, so users can enjoy private audio from favourite streaming services, apps, and games, as well as Alexa.

To pair hearing aids, users can visit Fire TV Settings, Accessibility, select Hearing Aids, and follow the on-screen instructions to connect them, much like you would with Bluetooth headphones.

"For an optimal experience, we recommend customers connect over a 5Ghz WiFi network, within 10 feet and in line of sight to Fire TV Cube," the company said.

"Due to the small size of hearing aids, their radio antennas require closer proximity for the best connection. Customers with 2.4GHz WiFi can still enjoy the feature, with range that varies depending on spectrum congestion," it added.

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