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Antibodies get stronger after vaccination

The study further stated that the desirable herd immunity which can break the chain of virus, can only be achieved by mass vaccination and not through natural course of transmission of infection

Antibodies get stronger after vaccination
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Antibodies get stronger after vaccination

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An antibody test, done on 989 KGMU healthcare workers and about 500 plasma donors by the King George's Medical University (KGMU), has found that antibodies formed after vaccination were stronger and lasted longer, whereas those generated after infection fizzled out in less than four months.

The study further found that the desirable herd immunity which can break the chain of virus, can only be achieved by mass vaccination and not through natural course of transmission of infection. In the two-part study, in which the 989 healthcare workers included class four employees, junior doctors, staff and senior faculty members, 869 (88 per cent) had antibodies.

Of 869, about 73 per cent had completed a two-dose vaccination course and 13 per cent had taken one dose. The remaining were those who had not taken vaccines but had acquired infection in the recent past few months. About 61 healthcare workers had not developed adequate antibodies even after taking both the doses.

Similarly, there were 25 workers who had taken a dose but had not developed antibodies. The remaining who lacked antibodies have not been vaccinated so far. Out of 500-odd plasma donors who came for donation 14 days to three months after recovery, only 50 per cent were found to be having adequate antibodies. These donors had either lost their antibodies prematurely or did not produce enough.

It could be because of low immunity or less severe infection. Prof Tulika Chandra, head of the transfusion medicine department, said, "This shows the probability of developing adequate antibodies that also last for a long period through vaccination, rather than acquiring infection in a natural way. The high percentage of antibodies in this group is a good sign, hinting at herd immunity through vaccination."

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